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student:firstyearstartup:start [2020/09/15 17:05]
ridderab
student:firstyearstartup:start [2022/06/28 11:46] (current)
bowersjc [Computer Guidelines]
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 ====== First Year Start-up Guide ====== ====== First Year Start-up Guide ======
 +
 +===== Computer Guidelines =====
 +
 +Most of our students have laptops: they're useful for your college career and being able to transport your CS work around with you. However, laptops are not required. The CS labs provide the necessary resources for students to complete work for any of their CS classes. 
 +
 +If you're wondering which laptop is right for you, it's more a question of personal preference than recommended specs. One of the most important considerations is how large/heavy it will be to carry around all day. 13-inch is popular among students and faculty. 15-inch has a nicer display but costs more and is heavier. 
 +
 +Our recommended minimum specs for a laptop: i5/r5 processor, 16gb of ram, 256gb SSD.
 +
 +Many professors use PC laptops (mostly running Linux Mint) and many professors use MacBook Pros. If you are considering a Mac, know that Apple tends to keep the same prices and upgrade the hardware periodically. Keep an eye on [[http://buyersguide.macrumors.com/#Retina_MacBook_Pro|MacRumors]] to know when to buy. And order via the [[http://store.apple.com/us-hed/|Apple Store for Education]] to get the student discount. Or just get yourself a reasonable PC and install [[http://www.linuxmint.com/|Linux Mint]] as a 2nd OS -- that's what we use in the CS labs.
 +
 +Also note that Apple has recently switched from Intel chips to Apple-made silicon. Certain software, like VMWare, may not work properly yet with the new hardware. This generally should not be a problem, especially not in any core class, but we have not thoroughly vetted the new hardware with all of our classes yet. 
  
 ===== How do Office Hours Work? ===== ===== How do Office Hours Work? =====
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 You can find CS professor office hours on the [[department:officehours:start| Faculty Office Hours ]] page. Additionally, the syllabus for each of your courses should list the office hours for that professor. Always check the syllabus before sending an email asking when office hours are.  You can find CS professor office hours on the [[department:officehours:start| Faculty Office Hours ]] page. Additionally, the syllabus for each of your courses should list the office hours for that professor. Always check the syllabus before sending an email asking when office hours are. 
 +
 ===== Departmental Clubs ===== ===== Departmental Clubs =====
  
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 We've all been there. "Googling" to the late and early hours of the day for help on that *one* bug you just can't figure out. Again, we've been there. While the vast internet is great, it can be hard to cut through to get the exact consistently valuable resources we can use during these times. One resource that will continue to be useful in your life as a computer scientist is [[https://stackoverflow.com/|Stack Overflow]]. A discussion forum "for developers, by developers," if you're having an issue, odds are so has someone else on this platform. Another, especially for more algorithmic issues, is [[https://www.geeksforgeeks.org/|GeeksforGeeks]]. Ranging from tutorials to in-depth explanations, GeeksforGeeks is great for getting some more additional background knowledge and extra practice. For hands-on practice, [[https://www.codecademy.com/|CodeCademy]] is a great resource with many languages. Lastly, [[https://learnxinyminutes.com/|Learn X in Y Minutes]] is another great condensed guide for almost any language you may use in your programming career and great to hold on to for those future courses where you may need a quick refresher. This is certainly not an exhaustive list, but it is a great place to start! We've all been there. "Googling" to the late and early hours of the day for help on that *one* bug you just can't figure out. Again, we've been there. While the vast internet is great, it can be hard to cut through to get the exact consistently valuable resources we can use during these times. One resource that will continue to be useful in your life as a computer scientist is [[https://stackoverflow.com/|Stack Overflow]]. A discussion forum "for developers, by developers," if you're having an issue, odds are so has someone else on this platform. Another, especially for more algorithmic issues, is [[https://www.geeksforgeeks.org/|GeeksforGeeks]]. Ranging from tutorials to in-depth explanations, GeeksforGeeks is great for getting some more additional background knowledge and extra practice. For hands-on practice, [[https://www.codecademy.com/|CodeCademy]] is a great resource with many languages. Lastly, [[https://learnxinyminutes.com/|Learn X in Y Minutes]] is another great condensed guide for almost any language you may use in your programming career and great to hold on to for those future courses where you may need a quick refresher. This is certainly not an exhaustive list, but it is a great place to start!
 +
 +===== Have other general questions and would like to speak to a fellow student? =====
 +
 +Our department ambassadors are here to help! Have a specific question? Just want to chat? Be sure to visit [[https://www.jmu.edu/cise/cs/contact-us/cs-ambassadors.shtml|here]] to schedule a video chat with one of our student ambassadors.
 +
 +===== University Resources for your non-CS Classes =====
 +
 +In addition to your CS classes, you're probably taking an SCOM, WRTC, and/or MATH class. Don't worry, the university has support for these classes, too!
 +[[https://www.jmu.edu/learning/programs/index.shtml|The Learning Centers]] has trained peer tutors who can work with you one-on-one. This is a FREE SERVICE worth taking advantage of!
 +  * [[https://www.jmu.edu/commcenter/|Communication Center]] can help with oral presentations and speech structure
 +  * [[https://www.jmu.edu/uwc/|The Writing Center]] has tutors who can assist with any paper: from rhetorical analysis to lab reports
 +  * The[[https://www.jmu.edu/smlc/| Science and Math Learning Center]] has drop-in hours with tutors (via web-ex) for many introductory courses in Math, Bio, Physics, Statistics, and Chemistry. 
 +
 +If you want help with study skills, time management, or adapting to online learning, schedule a meeting with [[https://www.jmu.edu/lsi/|Learning Strategies Instruction]].
 +
 +Also check out the Libraries extensive list of support for students adapting to [[https://www.lib.jmu.edu/temporary-online-teaching/|online learning]]. 
 +
 +Not sure where to even start? Schedule a meeting with the [[https://calendly.com/paigenormand/30min|CS Advisor]], Paige Normand: you can talk through your situation and she can help point you in the right direction. 
 +